There was an incident in Lubbock this weekend that got me thinking, And while I don't wish anyone having their house hit by a car, Unfortunately for one family in the Hub City not only has this happened once... but twice

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Here's a quick play by play if you don't have time for the link earlier in the year the home was struck by a drunk driver (surprise, surprise) going through the child's bedroom on one side of the house and over the weekend another section of the house was struck by a second drunk driver. while repairs were still going on in the first area hit! talk about unlucky!

Aleksandar Kamasi

Does Amarillo Have a Home Like This?

The short answer is no, the long answer is Kinda, The homes along I-40 have been hit a few times. A home at I-40 and Crockett had been hit in 2015 by a Volkswagen Jetta that ran over the yard and stopped shy of going through the front door getting stuck on the patio. Last January a home on Fanin had been hit as well killing the driver.

There is a common theme here when this happens, A combination of speed and being drunk make for a no win situation for homeowners. but then again drunk driving isn't just an issue for home owners in this town, Local first responders have also taken a few punches this year

It's not just the drunks.

Lets face it, our access roads in this town stink. the merges and yields are weird, there's nothing like them anywhere else in Texas they are certainly accidents waiting to happen no drinking nessicarily.

Hopefully this doesn't become a new trend

See the Must-Drive Roads in Every State

Check Out The Original Names For These Amarillo Streets

It's hard to imagine these well-known Amarillo streets as any other name. Try to imagine giving directions to someone while using their original names. Gets tricky, doesn't it?

The new names (that we currently know them by) came mostly from associates of Henry Luckett, who drew the first map of the area. When this took place exactly, records do not show, but the street name revamp is covered extensively in 'Old Town Amarillo' by Judge John Crudgington, published in the Plains Historical Review in 1957.