I came across something today that made me do a double-take. One, because of the name. It is definitely an attention grabber. Two, because it's a DIY event in place of ones we came to expect.

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Enter Curb A Con in Amarillo. It's a do-it-yourself comic con in a person's driveway. Yes, a comic convention is being held, in Amarillo, in someone's driveway.

And apparently, it has been successful enough to warrant having more.

2nd Annual Curb A Con; a Driveway Comic-Con

This year we're getting the 2nd Annual Curb A Con. According to the event's description, it was started in 2020 (which checks out if you do the math) when all of the "cons" in the area had to be canceled due to the pandemic.

Not being content with just waiting it out for a year and hoping for the best, the husband-wife duo of Clemmons Comics & Crafts decided to have their own event; in their driveway. The first event was successful enough that they did it again later in the year.

This year, in their driveway and front yard, there will be vendors and artists from around the Amarillo area. It isn't all just comic books. There are all kinds of craft vendors that will be there too.

Curb A Con is also putting it out there that we can also expect prizes for cosplay. Just imagine being one of the neighbors with me for a second. It made me giggle too.

Don't Take "No" For an Answer; Do It Yourself

Down to brass tacks, this is freaking awesome. I love seeing things like this. While the pandemic has upended some of our favorite events, there are those of us out there taking matters into our own hands. Hats off to Curb A Con.

For more info on Curb A Con, follow this link. It will be June 19 from 12 PM to 6 PM, and it's free to attend.

Downtown Amarillo Over The Years

Downtown Amarillo has seen an incredible metamorphosis. Take a look at the photos below to see just how much it's changed--you won't believe the difference.

Check Out The Original Names For These Amarillo Streets

It's hard to imagine these well-known Amarillo streets as any other name. Try to imagine giving directions to someone while using their original names. Gets tricky, doesn't it?

The new names (that we currently know them by) came mostly from associates of Henry Luckett, who drew the first map of the area. When this took place exactly, records do not show, but the street name revamp is covered extensively in 'Old Town Amarillo' by Judge John Crudgington, published in the Plains Historical Review in 1957.