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When you cast your November ballot, there are going to be several things besides political offices that you will be voting for. In the Amarillo area, there are 3 propositions that will be on the ballot to determine the future of Amarillo and the surrounding region. A proposition, also known as a ballot measure, is a piece of proposed legislation to be approved or rejected by eligible voters. I am sure by now you have seen political signs all over town either for or against this propositions, but what exactly are they?

Proposition A (also known as Proposition 1) has to do with the future of the Amarillo Civic Center Complex. It is no secret that our civic center is in poor shape and way to small to support the events that we want to bring to Amarillo. The vote is whether or not to approve a $275 million bond that will go towards the civic center and surrounding projects. With an approval of Prop A, there would be an arena added to the civic center, as well as an overhaul of the existing facility, a park area, moving City Hall, a new parking garage, and other improvements to the area. The tax increase to residents would be $130.82 a year for a home valued at $100,000.

Proposition B (also know as Proposition 2) would allow members of the Amarillo City Council to serve a 4 year term, rather than their current 2 year term. If passed, staggered elections would also be put in place. This would also mean that the mayor's term would be increased from 2 to 4 years.

Proposition C (also known as Proposition 3) would allow the Amarillo City Council to limit the amount of council meetings they have to just 2 a month. Currently, they are required to meet 4 times per month.

Early voting is currently underway and this is the first time in 4 years that there have been propositions on the ballot for Amarillo. In each of these cases, there are definite pros and cons to the issue at stake. I have only provided a brief overview of each proposition so that you have an idea of what they mean. I highly encourage you to get all the facts before you vote. While some of these issues might sound better than others, take the time to learn the impacts before you cast your vote.